Various Artists Reviews

Bookmarks: Steinway to Heaven ~ Music for the 3rd Millennium ~ Keyboards Triangle ~ Pazzo Fanfano Di Musica

From: Mark Fonda
np: Steinway to Heaven - Magna Carta's 1996 tribute to the classics of Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, Liszt, etc. played by the contemporaries including Emerson, Wakeman, Rudess, Moraz, Auger, etc.

From: "Surjorimba Suroto" <>
Re: Steinway to Heaven: First of all, this is not a tribute to Led Zeppelin. It's a Magna Carta release featuring keyboardists played classical music in their own style. I'm not sure if it's prog. But since keyboard maestros were here, I think it fits this forum. Keith Emerson, Patrick Moraz and Rick Wakeman were among the many in this album. They played Chopin, Bach, Beethoven, etc. I'm planning to buy this album, but there's few review about it. Even on Magna Carta. Does anybody ever heard this album? Is it worth the money?

From: "Mark Fonda" <>
Re: Steinway to Heaven: I have this CD and as you said it is classics of Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, Liszt, etc. played by the contemporaries including Emerson, Wakeman, Rudess, Moraz, Auger, etc.  It is all straight acoustic piano with no other instruments.  I find it a bit dry and it is not progressive rock at all, so set your sights accordingly.  I think you can hear the personalities of the artists in the individual pieces.  The opening piece by Keith Emerson (Ginastera's Dance Creole) is very lively and entertaining; the second piece by Rick Wakeman (Beethoven's Pathetique) is pretty flat and uninspiring; the Jordan Rudess piece (Chopin's Revolutionary Etude) is very passionate and intense; the David Bryan piece (Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata) is very delicate and emotional; the Patrick Moraz piece (Chopin's Military Polonaise) is powerful, but a bit cumbersome; the Brian Auger piece (Faure's Padane Op. 50) is flowing and passionate.  You really have to like piano to get into this one.

From: "Marc P. Guilbert" <>
Re: Steinway to Heaven: Mark says it well.  The only hing I have to add is that I was initially excited about getting a well recorded "Creole Dance" without the distracting MIDI jangling bells and string pads.  This fits the bill, but unfortunately Emo changed the ending from his stage version so it just sort of fizzles out at the end.

From: "Carsten Busch" <>
Re: Steinway to Heaven: It's *very* classical. If you like classical piano stuff give it a try, else...

From: Peter Wilton <>
Re: Steinway to Heaven: It almost seems to me that the makers of this record deliberately listed the tracks in descending order of competence, mainly because the last two tracks seem very badly played (Dizzy Reed and who else?), like a child practising frantically an hour before his next piano lesson!
> The only hing I have to add is that I was initially excited about getting a well recorded "Creole Dance" without the distracting MIDI jangling bells and string pads.  This fits the bill, but unfortunately Emo changed the ending from his stage version so it just sort of fizzles out at the end.
The only difference is that he plays three staccato "stabs" on the lower register of the piano, instead of leaping up for a single open octave on the upper register.  I'm surprised that this ending was a "change" - I'd always imagined the other one was probably a bit of extra acrobatics Emerson added to the end for effect in a live performance.  The studio version strikes me as a typical ending for a 20th century "classical" percussive piano piece, and for me gives a better sense of finality than the live version.

From: "Mark Fonda" <>
The new compilation from AMP Records entitled "Music for the 3rd Millennium" featuring unreleased tracks from Patrick Moraz, Rick Wakeman, Richard Pinhas, Steve Jolliffe, Isao Tomita, Keith Emerson, Synergy (Larry Fast) and 7 others is superb!!... one of the best compilations you will find for keyboard enthusiasts. The CD was released on August 11, 1999 at 11:11am BST, the moment of totality for the European Solar Eclipse (the "Millennium Eclipse"). Most of the tracks are quite progressive, although some lean towards ambient-techno and electronic-classical. Mark Jenkins did a fine job in collecting this diverse set of keyboard-based tracks which celebrate the eclipse and the new millennium in grand fashion. There is more information at www.ampmusic.demon.co.uk

The Synergy track is entitled "Moon Caves" (5:05) and is very 90's sounding with some sleek/sinister sequencers and "Metropolitan Suite" type melody. It's perhaps the best track on the disc. I'll have to ask Mark Jenkins if it is new or not. It's equally surprising to have a track from Tomita!! Some people were recently surmising he was gone.
From Mark Jenkins (AMP Music): Larry Fast's track has not been used anywhere before. It's a few years old, but I think he believed it was a little out of context with his other stuff (more rhythmic). Tomita's still extremely busy, but what I didn't realise is that he does many orchestral scores, nothing to do with synthesizers, which are for TV projects and which don't always get an album release, and when they do it's often only in Japan. He just did an orchestral album "The Tale of Genji" which is very nice but has no synths. His next commission is music for the upcoming Disney Seaworld near Tokyo. Nice work if you can get it...

From: "Carlos Lima" <>
The great news are that Musea is already distributing the "Keyboards Triangle" CD. :-) I already have my copy, and all I could say, after the first listening, is that I'm AMAZED! You should save some bucks for this CD, and a little extra bucks to repaint your room because I'm sure the ink will crack after you listen to it, hehehe... Long live keyboards-prog!

From: "Koichi Matsuyama" <>
This one is very good, highly recommended. I paid almost $25.00 for the domestic press including sales tax here in Japan. I have noticed the cover difference between Japanese press and Musea press. Japanese press cover features an armadillo-tank, reminds us of the cover of "Tarkus". Mesea press features Keiko Kumagai of Ars Nova. Ars Nove fan shall better buy the later.

From: SONIQ95@aol.com
We have the tarkus inside though on the face of the CD. I was upset that the picture of Keiko was only from hips to lips, they chopped the top of her face off.  Music is fabulous though.  Especially the cover of Toccata, and Tarkus.

From: "umocheech" <>
Subject: Re: Keyboards Triangle II
> I can?t believe it?s been released and I didn?t get it! BTW, anyone already listened to this gem?
Yeah, it came out a while back. I prefer the first one, since this one doesn't have Arsnova, just Gerard. Get it, anyway.

From: "Jeff Marx" <>
Date: Tue Mar 11, 2003 11:49 pm
Yup, the second one doesn't quite compare with the brilliant display by Arsnova and Gerard on the first album. Without Arsnova, there's a sameness to the thing, and Gerard don't really 'push' the covers very hard...whilst the vocals are sadly abysmal to my aging hearing apparati. Gerard's last two albums are far more rewarding listening fare for my prog dollar. I will say that their version of 21st Century SM is impressive tho'!

From: "Jet" <>
Date: Tue Mar 11, 2003 8:41 am Subject: Re: Keyboards Triangle II
I also prefer the first one, mostly because it contained tunes from artists I wasn't previously familiar with. I was familiar with all of the tunes on Triangle II, and I don't feel that Gerard really brought anything radically new to the table. Still a fun listen, though. I much prefer Gerard's original material; I have their 4 most recent studio albums and they're all fantastic!!

From: "Mark Fonda" <>
Anyone familiar with a release called "Pazzo Fanfano Di Musica" which is an Italian Rock Tribute from 1989 (Made in Japan Records) featuring Sakuraba and members from Outer Limits, Mr. Sirius and Magdalena? It's mentioned in the liner notes (of Motoi Sakuraba / Gikyokuonsou) and it sounds very interesting!

From: Hubert Jakobs <>
"Pazzo Fanfano Di Musica" This is what I wrote about it recently on the r.m.p. newsgroup: It's a beautiful piece of chamber rock. 10 musicians from various Japanese groups (like Motoi Sakuraba [Deja-Vu], Mr. Sirius Kazuhiro Miyatake, Takashi Aramaki [Ataraxia, Outer Limits, Vienna] + several other Outer Limits, Mugen, Pageant, Deja-Vu members) playing acoustic & electric guitar, cello, contrabass, violin, flute, piano, mellotron, celesta, organ and drums. The music is mostly acoustic and instrumental, but has also it's rockier moments and female vocals by Megumi Tokuhisa (Magdalena, Teru's Symphonia, btw mr. Teru himself - Terutsugu Hirayama - is one of the composers). Wonderful stuff. Interestingly, all the song titles and other information is in Italian, thus adding to the overall elegance of this masterpiece!

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